Thursday, September 29, 2016

Wrapping Up September

That was fast. September over. Now, October greets us. As summer wound down I was able to take advantage of cooler days and move a few things around. Yes, already--moving plants! We were also able to plug away on a few projects. Here's a wrap-up of September:


Pennisetum 'Karly Rose' in the evening sun. I see why it's got the name rose in it. Two of these grasses were gifted to me at our garden blogger's spring plant swap. I did not know what to expect but am very pleased.



Paths throughout the labyrinth garden that were simply sand are now graveled. As plants fill in I am hopeful that they will spill over and soften the edges. In time, in time...


From another angle. It dresses it up a bit.


On to the shed. I had painted over red trim with the charcoal gray. We've seen that post here. David surprised me, however, by building this:


A porch roof for the garden shed.


With a coat of paint. I think I'll paint the underside to look like a galaxy of stars. Facilities Manager is busy building another addition on to this building complex - an overhang area to shelter the lawn mower parking spot. You can see that to the left. I'm also getting shelves to organize my empty plastic pots on the back of the shed. Hooray! More photos when those projects are complete.



Last week we saw the near completion of the fire pit. Here, several more flagstones were added. As you can see we had a fire or two to break it in. What a joy to have this homey feature....evokes memories of sitting around the campfire, telling stories, roasting marshmallows. Now we need to update those chairs. Facilities Manager bought those in about 1989. Ouch!


The chicken coop/cube was dressed up with a clematis or two and support panels. In time, the green will be gone...waa ha ha ha (evil laugh).


Facilities Manager has been busy taking down this dying maple tree.


He is almost there, but a slight chainsaw accident rendered FM banned from the chainsaw. He is only allowed to use it with a buddy around. Thank the heavens for our fab neighbor nurse Faux Doctor Mary MacGyver. She took care of FM and we owe her big time. We have the BEST neighbors! FM is fine, by the way. Just a bit scarred on the arm and thumb with no stitches and a new humbled spirit.



The whole of Mt. Compost is gone! Thrilling. Now I am left with this dead grass area that should become more meadow-like garden, don't you agree? Oh, the ideas rolling around in my head. That's how I roll, adding this and that, coming up with dreamy ideas left and right until the right one lands and sticks.


Now that we've covered all the chores, let's have some plant fun. Goldenrod - Solidago 'Fireworks', a village for pollinators. Its late season bloom is a welcome flush of color. This non-invasive version of goldenrod is a must-have for attracting bees.


The rudbeckias and gaillardias or blanket flowers have been blooming all summer. I know they are short-lived but they are place holders for now, anyhow. They were here on the property so I simply rounded them up to this more appropriate location. I hope they do self-sow around over the years, that would be a welcome plant for my pseudo-meadow.


Zinnias!


Zinnia 'Senorita' - an annual I direct sowed into the garden. It has performed quite well, I am pleased with its salmon/coral color.


The labyrinth garden starting to show some filling in, depth, and layered effects.


My favorite upright sedum - Sedum telephium 'Matrona' has done very well here. They too are a haven for pollinators.


Here's a short video showing many bees enjoying this plant. If you enlarge it by clicking the full screen button on the lower right it shows up better.


As I have removed annuals from this front bed of the gravel garden and opened up space, some of the more permanent residents are able to stretch out more. The three Ceanothus 'Italian Skies' just at the base of the deck are filling in nicely as well as adding a little frothy glow at sunset.


In the same bed to the left, some of my favorite plants are filling in the gaps and already look like an established garden rather than just nine months old. Here, from left to right: Verbena bonariensis, Pelargonium sidoides, Erodium chrysanthum (foreground), Glaucium flavum or horned poppy and behind them chocolate cosmos and Pennisetum 'Karly Rose'. Whew. There is more, believe it or not, that is not pictured from this angle.


Agave ovatifolia 'Vanzie', one of three purchased at Little Prince of Oregon. I am so excited to watch these grow over the next several years. They have already put on a surprising amount of growth.


One of three yuccas moved from the old garden. After sulking for several months they are finally putting on new growth instead of dying.



I was given a "mystery clematis" at work, it finally bloomed. It lives on the other side of the chicken coop. So lovely! I wonder if the future chickens will eat it?


Grevillea victoriae, purchased from work this spring, has grown significantly.


Olives! The four Olea europaea 'Arbequina' trees planted have produced a surprising number of fruits. I grow these plants for their silvery linear foliage, the olives are a bonus.



One day soon we'll be able to actually enjoy our deck.


Since it's officially fall, I thought this image of a volunteer pumpkin would make some smiles. I left a couple of heirloom pumpkins out in this general area last fall for the deer to eat. I think this may be a seedling of Musquee de Provence pumpkin. Anyone care to chime in? Aren't those variegated leaves fantastic?


So sweet! The plant is HUGE. Pumpkins have a long way to go.

That is a wrap for September. As autumn rolls in, I feel a sense of relief that I will be able to slow down a bit. It's been a whirlwind of a summer adding plants MADLY all over the place, it will be fun to sit back and watch them fill in and see who does what.

Thank you so much for reading and until next time, happy gardening!


14 comments :

  1. I love the porch roof on your shed. Every one of your posts amazes me with how quickly your garden has gotten off and running, producing volunteer pumpkins no less!

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    1. I'm kind of surprised myself, Kris to tell the truth. I think I'm going on momentum -- thinking that if I slow down I'll never resume the same level of energy.

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  2. You are an inspiration: way ahead of us, and we have been plugging away for 10+ years. If you were not such great folks, I would probably be consumed with envy.

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    1. Oh, Rickii, you are too sweet :) Look, I have a retired husband/Facilities Manager....that makes all the difference!

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  3. Seeing your progress is absolutely thrilling - and unbelievable. Makes me wonder what kind of time warp I live in where, no matter how hard I try, nothing ever seems to get done. Scary to hear about FM's accident - I'm glad you had swift, nearby help, and that it wasn't as bad as it could have been. Shudder to even think about it...

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    1. Well, my Dear Anna Bean, YOU have children. I have cats. That's the time warp situation!

      Thank you for the concern over the chainsaw accident, DP is fine and very much humbled. We ARE lucky. As our neighbor says, if you live in the country (we kind of do), it's inevitable to have some kind of similar accident. Oy.

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  4. Dang, it looks even better than when me and dad visited a little while ago! So many successes!

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    1. Thanks Fifi! You rock! The Stipa gigantea is planted in its new home, thank you so much!

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  5. You and the FM are amazing. I cannot believe how much work has occurred in 9 months. It's going to be so fulfilling for you to see your selections fill in and create the atmosphere that you are seeking.

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    1. Oh, it will be a wonder when some of this grows in (with a little luck from mother nature)....I hope you can come out and visit it sometime!

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  6. With your rainfall, those new gravel paths will be softened in no time. I was also impressed with my first year with 'Karley Rose,' a nice mediumish grass as far as vigor. So many pennisetums are behemoths here, it's nice to find one semi-dainty. And I like your new chainsaw rules! Thank goodness the FM is OK.

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    1. Karley is so pretty, I'm really impressed. And yes, the chainsaw man has been humbled...thank goodness indeed!

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  7. nice images.. very beautiful garden

    nice photos.. thanks for sharing your gardening experience

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